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Technical Knowledge in American Culture, Technical Knowledge in American Culture, 0817307931, 0-8173-0793-1, 978-0-8173-0793-6, 9780817307936, , Hist of American Science and Technology, Technical Knowledge in American Culture, 0817382720, 0-8173-8272-0, 978-0-8173-8272-8, 9780817382728, , Hist of American Science and Technolog

Technical Knowledge in American Culture
Science, Technology, and Medicine Since the Early 1800s
Edited by Hamilton Cravens, Alan I Marcus, and David M. Katzman

Quality Paper
1996. 280 pp.
978-0-8173-0793-6
Price:  $34.95 s
E Book
2009. 280 pp.
978-0-8173-8272-8
Price:  $34.95 d

Addresses the relationships between what modern-day experts say to each other and to their constituencies

Technical Knowledge in American Culture addresses the relationships between what modern-day experts say to each other and to their constituencies and whether what they say and do relates to the larger culture, society, and era. These essays challenge the social impact model by looking at science, technology, and medicine not as social activities but as intellectual activities.


Hamilton Cravens is professor of history, Iowa State University. He is author of The Triumph of Evolution: The Nature-Nature Controversy, 1900–1941 and Before Head Start: The Iowa Station and America’s Children.
 
Alan I Marcus is professor of history and director of the Center for Historical Studies at Iowa State University. He is author of Agricultural Science and the Quest for Legitimacy: Farmers, Agricultural College and Experiment Stations, 1870–1890 and Technology in America: A Brief History.
 
David M. Katzman is professor of American Studies and of history at the University of Kansas. He is author of Before the Ghetto: Black Detroit in the Nineteenth Century and Seven Days a Week: Women and Domestic Service in Industrializing America.
 
“This volume vigorously challenges the new social history of science, technology, and medicine. Through a remarkably cohesive series of case studies it demonstrates that underlying cultural notions in any given era shape, inform, and inspire that era’s technical knowledge and discourse. The book will appeal to established scholars and their students alike. This is revisionist history in the best sense.”
—Howard P. Segal, University of Maine
 
“The editors have succeeded in producing a book that possesses both cohesiveness and coherence. The individual essays are illuminating and significant, interesting and provocative. . . . As a group they have an important message to convey that offers a counterweight to the current dominance of social history an alternate point of view that is much needed.”
—Gerald N. Grob, Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research
 
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