Log In | Account Info
Cart | Checkout
     
 
Rebel Storehouse, Rebel Storehouse, 0817307761, 0-8173-0776-1, 978-0-8173-0776-9, 9780817307769, , , Rebel Storehouse, 0817350586, 0-8173-5058-6, 978-0-8173-5058-1, 9780817350581,

Rebel Storehouse
Florida's Contribution to the Confederacy
by Robert A. Taylor

Trade Cloth
2004. 232 pp.
978-0-8173-0776-9
Price:  $33.95 s
Quality Paper
2003. 232 pp.
978-0-8173-5058-1
Price:  $24.95 t

Brings to light an overlooked aspect of Florida’s importance to the Confederacy.


Florida's role in the Civil War has long been overlooked or discounted by students of the conflict. Despite its isolation and the lack of important land battles, the state made a contribution to the Confederate war effort far out of proportion to its small population. After seceding from the Union in 1861, Florida joined the Confederacy with a reputation, born in the 1850s, as an area of great agricultural potential for the newly created country. Rebel leaders quickly came to regard Florida as an abundant source of foodstuffs.
The state became a major supplier of salt, beef, pork, and corn both for the rebel forces and for many civilians. Cattle in particular were driven northward in large numbers, providing rations for Confederate troops from Chattanooga to Charleston. Unfortunately, however, senior officials in the field and in Richmond often held unrealistic expectations about the volume of supplies Floridians could actually deliver. These same authorities for the most part also failed adequately to defend this crucial food source, a factor that may have accelerated the Confederacy's ultimate disintegration.


 


Robert A. Taylor is Associate Professor of History at Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne and author or editor of six books, including Florida in the Civil War.

 


"Very interesting and informative. Taylor's research seems to be exhaustive, and the book is well organized and clearly written. I know of no other work that both details the state's contribution and evaluates its effectiveness toward the southern cause."
—Donald W. Curl, Florida Atlantic University

"A solid account of Florida's importance economically during the war. A fascinating chronicle."
—Fred Blakey, University of Florida

Also of Interest

Confederate Florida
by William H. Nulty


Florida Territory in 1844
Edward Anderson, edited by W. Stanley Hoole


Blockade Runners of the Confederacy
by Hamilton Cochran


Blockaders, Refugees, and Contrabands
by George E. Buker