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History of Metals in Colonial America, History of Metals in Colonial America, 0817300538, 0-8173-0053-8, 978-0-8173-0053-1, 9780817300531, , , History of Metals in Colonial America, 0817389539, 0-8173-8953-9, 978-0-8173-8953-6, 9780817389536,

History of Metals in Colonial America
James A. Mulholland

Quality Paper
1981. 232 pp.
978-0-8173-0053-1
Price:  $29.95 s
E Book
232 pp.
978-0-8173-8953-6
Price:  $29.95 d

 

The story of the introduction and growth of the technology of metals in the North American colonial period entails significant developments beyond the transfer of the technology from the Old World to the New. In the struggle to create an indigenous industry, in the efforts to encourage and support the work of metals craftsmen, in the defiance of British attempts to regulate manufacturing of metals, the colonial society developed a metals technology that became the basis for future industrial growth.
            The author traces colonial industrial development from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries in nine chapters: “Before Jamestown,” “Metals in the Early Colonies,” “Copper in the Colonies,” “Colonial Iron: The Birth of an Industry,” “Metals Manufacture in the Colonial Period,” “Colonial Iron: Regulation and Rebellion,” “Metals and the Revolution,” “The Critical Years,” and “Reflections on the End of an Era.”

 


James A. Mulholland is assistant professor of history, North Carolina State University.


"Mulholland has welded a large amount of diverse information into a fine general account. Everything from mining and processing to handicrafts and technological transfer fit into a tightly bound narrative, and Mulholland's efforts to integerate the role of metals, particuilarly iron, into the overall development of colonial America is balanced and judicious."
—Business History Review

 

“A substantial, well-written, well-organized, and interpretively sound contribution to our knowledge of a subject that has received far less scholarly attention than its intrinsic importance merits.” – W. David Lewis, Auburn University

 


1982 AAUP BOOK AND JOURNAL SHOW, sponsored by Association of American University Presses

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